Balmaclellan

Balmaclellan NX 6579                    

Means House of McLellan
Balmaclellan lies on the side of a hill on the east side of the valley of the River Ken on the A712 between New Galloway and Corsock..   It has a population of about 140, there is a church, a shop that is also the post office (a mobile post office now visits twice per week) and a tea room, a smithy which is now a restaurant and garage, a pottery and a clog maker who works in the old school and a church where there is a memorial to Robert Paterson (see below).
In the past the village had links with the Cistercian monks at Dundrennan Abbey through sheep farming.  The village has a 12th or 13th century Norman Motte near the church which is fairly well preserved and a Bronze Age mirror was found in the area.

Close to the north of the village may be found The Holy Linn, a small waterfall and pool in the Garpol burn used by the Covenanters as a place of worship and where children were baptised.
Some miles east of Balmaclellan lies Craigenputtock farm where Thomas Carlisle lived from 1828 to 1834 which belonged to his wife’s family and where he wrote “Sartor Resartus” and many important essays.
The Scottish Wildlife trust Knowtop Reserve can be found 5 miles to the east of the village on the A712 road to Corsock  (See Wildlife)
'Old Mortality', or Robert Paterson was by profession a stone mason, born in the parish of Hawick in 1715. He settled in Dumfriesshire and married around 1745. To begin with he seems to have done some paid work and spent the rest of his time travelling round the area attending conventicles and setting up memorial stones to remember 'the righteous', but from 1758 he seems to have spent all his time travelling leaving his wife and family to fend for themselves. His wife in desperation sent her oldest son, then 12 to look for him and persuade him to come home, but he took no heed, the same happened when she sent her 2 daughters, so eventually she moved to Balmaclellan in 1768 and opened the school where she worked until her death in 1785. Two of their sons, Robert and Walter became stone engravers in Balmaclellan, and many years later Joseph Train met Robert and passed his father's story on to Sir Walter Scott. Robert senior, travelled all over south west Scotland working for nothing, though he never lack lodging, and finally died at Caerlaverock in 1801 in possession of the sum of £7 7s 10d where he is buried in an unmarked grave.
Elspeth McEwan from Bogha or Gubha near Cubbox in Balmaclellan parish was accused of making her neighbours hens stop laying and having a movable wooden pin that could draw off milk from their cows, she was examined before Dalry kirk session in 1696, imprisoned and tortured in Kirkcudbright Tolbooth until she confessed and found guilty of "a compact and correspondence with the devil and of charms and of accession to malefices" and executed in 1698 - burned at the stake in Kirkcudbright - the last in Galloway.
 

Parish of Balmaclellan
The parish has an area of 94.4 sq. km (36.4 sq. miles).
Balmaclellan has 6 neighbouring parishes;
namely Dalry, Dunscore, Glencairn, Kells, Kirkpatrick Durham and Parton.

Settlements:  * Balmaclellan
    * Barmurrie
    * Blackcraig
    * Crogo
   
Drumwhirn
    * Gibbshill
    * Ironmacannie
    * Knocklea
    * Knocklearn

Waterhead
Features:    
    * Barscobe Hill
    * Barscobe Loch
    * Blackcraig Hill
 
    * Brack, Loch
    * Garcrogo Forest
    * Holme House

    * Howie, Loch
    * Ken,

Water of
    * Lowes Lochs
    * Shirmers Burn
    * Skae, Loch
    * Troston, Loch

Barscobe Castle
Built:     1648

Barscobe Hill rises to 257m (843 feet) to the east of Barscobe Castle and 1¼ miles
(2 km) northeast of Balmaclellan.

 

 

Balmaclellan NX 6579

Means House of McLellan

Balmaclellan lies on the side of a hill on the east side of the valley of the River Ken on the A712 between New Galloway and Corsock..  It has a population of about 140, there is a church, a shop that is also the post office and a tea room, a smithy and garage, a pottery and a clog maker who works in the old school and a church where there is a memorial to Robert Paterson (see below)

In the past the village had links with the Cistercian monks at Dundrennan Abbey through sheep farming. The village has a 12th or 13th century Norman Motte near the church which is fairly well preserved and a Bronze Age mirror was found in the area.

Close to the north of the village may be found The Holy Linn, a small waterfall and pool in the Garpol burn used by the Covenanters as a place of worship and where children were baptised.

Some miles east of Balmaclellan lies Craigenputtock farm where Thomas Carlisle lived from 1828 to 1834 which belonged to his wife’s family and where he wrote “Sartor Resartus” and many important essays.

The Scottish Wildlife trust Knowtop Reserve can be found 5 miles to the east of the village on the A712 road to Corsock (See Wildlife)

'Old Mortality', or Robert Paterson was by profession a stone mason, born in the parish of Hawick in 1715. He settled in Dumfriesshire and married around 1745. To begin with he seems to have done some paid work and spent the rest of his time travelling round the area attending conventicles and setting up memorial stones to remember 'the righteous', but from 1758 he seems to have spent all his time travelling leaving his wife and family to fend for themselves. His wife in desperation sent her oldest son, then 12 to look for him and persuade him to come home, but he took no heed, the same happened when she sent her 2 daughters, so eventually she moved to Balmaclellan in 1768 and opened the school where she worked until her death in 1785. Two of their sons, Robert and Walter became stone engravers in Balmaclellan, and many years later Joseph Train met Robert and passed his father's story on to Sir Walter Scott. Robert senior, travelled all over south west Scotland working for nothing, though he never lack lodging, and finally died at Caerlaverock in 1801 in possession of the sum of £7 7s 10d where he is buried in an unmarked grave.

Elspeth McEwan from Bogha or Gubha near Cubbox in Balmaclellan parish was accused of making her neighbours hens stop laying and having a movable wooden pin that could draw off milk from their cows, she was examined before Dalry kirk session in 1696, imprisoned and tortured in Kirkcudbright Tolbooth until she confessed and found guilty of "a compact and correspondence with the devil and of charms and of accession to malefices" and executed in 1698 - burned at the stake in Kirkcudbright - the last in Galloway.